Scientific Program

Day 1

Day 2

Day 1

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • CIRCULAR TYPE EXTERNAL FIXATOR -ASSISTED ACUTE FEMORAL DEFORMITY CORRECTION AND SUBSEQUENT LENGTHENING OVER AN INTRAMEDULLARY NAIL: CASE REPORT

    Uskudar Hospital
    Turkey
    Biography

    Engin Eren Desteli has completed his PhD at the age of 24 years Hacettepe University,Turkey.He is MD of Orthopedics at Uskudar Hospital,Istanbul, He has over 50 publications that have been cited over 70 times.He has been serving as an editorial member at 2 medical journals.He has written chapters in some orthopedic and Traumatology textbooks such as ‘Basic Techniques for Extremity Reconstruction’ by Springer.

    Abstract

    Background: Intramedullar nails can be used together with external fixators in treatment of deformity correction. In the case presented here, femoral malunion with 90 degrees external rotation deformity together with shortness of the affected limb is corrected using these two methods together. Methods: The patient presented with a malunion at subtrochanteric region of femur, an external rotation deformity of 90 degrees and 2 cm shortness of the affected limb. A uni-lateral external fixator was applied under fluoroscopy. An osteotomy was made by applying the multiple drill-hole technique under fluoroscopy of the metaphyseal area in the femoral distal supracondylar region and the prepared nail was placed in the medullar canal. An intramedullar guide was placed within the intramedullar canal retrograde from the intercondylar notch. The uni-lateral fixator was then removed and previously prepared circular type external fixator was fixed to the femur. On postoperative day 10 distraction was started at the rae of 4x0.25 mm/day. Results: Satisfactory deformity correction and limb lengthening was achieved. Conclusion: Acute correction of the deformity and gradual correction of the limb length discrepancy can be achieved with combined treatment along with fewer complications.

  • MENOPAUSE AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    MOTHER THERESA POST GRADUATE AND RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF HEALTH SCIENCES
    India
    Biography

    Prof. DR. Manjubala Dash, working as a professor in nursing. Specialty is obstetric and Gynaecological nursing. Had 20 years of teaching experience in the field of Nursing. She has organized National and International Conferences, workshops in the field of nursing. Had participated and presented more than 100 papers in the National and international conferences. Had published articles nearly 50 in national and international Journals. She is the co-editor of International Journal of Nursing Panorama, The Genesis, Contemporary journal of Microbiology etc. Published 3 books in the field of Midwifery and Word management. Contributed chapters for Midwifery Books. She is a National Trainer for Infant and Young Child Feeding Counselling Specialist course. Did many research project under DHR and ICMR, DST etc. main interest is in research, education, and administration. Conducted many programmes for antenatal, postnatal mothers at the community level and hospital level. She got the opportunity to deliver a talk at the International and National Conferences. She is guiding the Students of UG, PG, and Ph.D. for Research. She is a recognized guide in different university and examiner for PG and Ph.D. Students too. She has gone for conducting Inspections to various colleges by the Indian Nursing Council.

    Abstract

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopause is medical treatment in surgically menopausal, perimenopause and postmenopausal women. Its goal is to mitigate discomfort caused by diminished circulating estrogen and progesterone hormones in menopause. Combination HRT is often recommended as it decreases the amount of endometrial hyperplasia and cancer associated with unopposed estrogen therapy. The main hormones involved are estrogen, progesterone and progestin. Some recent therapies include the use of androgens as well. Women who should take hormone replacement therapy. There are several groups of women where the use of HRT might be indicated: those experiencing symptoms of the menopause, such as hot flushes, sweats or genitourinary symptoms; those that have had an early menopause; as a second-line therapy for osteoporosis protection in women over 50 years old; women who shouldn’t take hormone replacement therapy. The risks of taking HRT are thought to outweigh the benefits for some women. For example, HRT may not advise in the following cases: if women have a history of womb (endometrial) cancer, ovarian cancer or breast cancer; if women have a history of blood clots (a DVT or a PE). If women have a personal or family history of blood clots, doctor may suggest doing a thrombophilia screen (a blood test to look for any blood clotting problems), if women have a history of heart attack, angina or stroke, if women have uncontrolled high blood pressure, if women are pregnant, if women have severe liver disease, if women have an undiagnosed breast lump and if women are being investigated for abnormal vaginal bleeding. The benefits of HRT. HRT is the most effective treatment for hot flushes and night sweats. HRT also effectively treats vaginal dryness. By reducing menopausal symptoms HRT may improve quality of life. HRT reduces the risk of postmenopausal bone fracture, including hip fracture. HRT use is not associated with weight gain. Side-effects of HRT Common side-effects associated with combined HRT are breast tenderness or enlargement, nausea, fluid retention and headache. Heavy, irregular or unscheduled bleeding can occur and is likely to need investigation if it occurs after the first six months of HRT use.

Menstrual Cycle
Chair
Co-Chair
Speaker
  • 1
    ROLE OF BRCA TEST IN PREVENTION OF CANCER
    Speaker
    Rekha G S
    Sagar Hospitals
    India
    Biography

    Rekha G S has experience in clinical, teaching, research field and public health. Her passion is in patient care, research and teaching.

    Abstract

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women after skin cancer. Mammograms can detect breast cancer early, possibly before it has spread. But BRCA will assess the risk of cancer in the family and thereby one can adopt prophylactic measures to prevent cancer. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer in women both in the developed and developing countries. It is estimated that worldwide over 508 000 women died in 2011 due to breast cancer. Although it was thought to be a disease of the developed countries, almost 50% of breast cancer cases and 58% of deaths occurred in developing countries. Incidence rates vary greatly worldwide from 19.3 per 100,000 women in Eastern Africa to 89.7 per 100,000 women in Western Europe. In most of the developing regions the incidence rates are below 40 per 100,000. The lowest incidence rates are found in most African countries, but interesting fact is that incidence is currently increasing in these regions. India accounts for the third highest number of cancer cases among women after China and the US and is growing annually at 4.5-5%. Indian mortality rates for breast and ovarian cancer are also the highest in the world. Statistics reveals that the mortality rates for cervical and breast cancer in India are 1.6 to 1.7 times higher than maternal mortality. We are now witnessing drastically increasing numbers of breast cancer to be in the younger women. To understand the role of BRCA in prevention of cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are human genes that produce tumour suppressor proteins. These proteins help to repair damaged DNA and, therefore, play a role in ensuring the stability of each cell’s genetic material. A harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation can be inherited from a person’s mother or father. Each child of a parent who carries a mutation in one of these genes has a 50% chance (or one chance in two) of inheriting the mutation. The effects of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are seen even when a person’s second copy of the gene is normal. The benefits of BRCA are enhanced screening, prophylactic (risk-reducing) surgery, chemoprevention and improving quality of life.

  • 2
    Association of earwax type, colostrums secretion and types of human axillary microbium: A study on Bangalee Hindu caste females of West Bengal, India
    Speaker
    Debasree Das
    Shyampur Siddheswari Mahavidyalaya, India
    India
    Biography

    Debasree Das has completed her MSc (specialization in Biological Anthropology) in 2015 from University of Calcutta and qualified for prestigious lectureship UGC conducted NET examination and admitted in the PhD program in Anthropology under the auspices of University of Calcutta. She has successfully completed the workshop in research methodology and presented research articles in Indian conferences. Working as a contractual fulltime Teacher in Anthropology in an institution that is affiliated to the University of Calcutta she is teaching the students in graduate level. She has a hand on experience in laboratory work regarding serology, electrophoresis, anthropometry and dermatoglyphic. She has the publication in peer reviewed journals.

    Abstract

    Previous studies revealed relationship between human earwax (cerumen) type and colostrums secretion. However, the earwax, colostrums are produced from apocrine gland. Furthermore, the human axillary gland secretion is also from apocrine gland. In this context, the present study is attempted to understand the association of earwax type, colostrums secretion and axillary microbium. To achieve the purpose, earwax type, information about colostrums secretion and axillary microbium have been obtained from 35 lactating Bengalee Hindu caste females. To best of the knowledge, this is the first attempt from India to understand the relationship between earwax type, colostrums secretion and axillary microbium. The result demonstrated significant (p<0.05) association between wet earwaxtype and colostrums secretion. To understand the relationship between axillary microbium and earwax type, the cultured microbium (taken from 11 participants) were digested by Hind III restriction enzyme and genotyping was done by agarose electrophoresis using standard technique. Examination on genotypes revealed three variations in genotypes e.g., A (>1000 bp), B (1000-750 bp) and C (750-500 bp) in cultured microbium. Further analysis demonstrated significant (p<0.05) association between wet earwax and B type of axillary microbium. Therefore, the present study envisaged strong association of wet earwax type with high colostrums secretion and B type axillary microbium.

  • FRACTURES IN ANKYLOSED VERTEBRAE NEWER APPROACHES IN MANAGEMENT
    Speaker
    Suhasish Ray
    Belvue Clinic
    India
    Abstract

    The incidence of spinal fractures in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) continues to increase despite the improvements in medical treatment. Depleted flexibility and altered biomechanics along with secondary osteoporosis make them more prone to unstable spinal injuries with minor or even unknown trauma. Difficulties in radiological assessment due to associated deformity can often mask the diagnosis. Advanced imaging techniques and screening of the entire spine are required in suspected cases. Surgical treatment is generally indicated because of the inherent instability of these fractures and frequent neurologic deficits. The choice of approach and fixation remains controversial, especially in cervical and cervicothoracic injuries. Whatever be the mode of treatment, the postinjury complication rates remain higher with significant mortality risk in those having associated comorbidities and neurological injury. However, avoidance of injury by adequate preventive measures, a high index of suspicion and appropriate precautions in the perioperative period can result in improved outcomes in these patients. A systematic computerized literature search was performed using Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, and PubMed. The publications made over the past 10 years were analyzed. The searches were performed using Medical Subject Headings and the subheadings used were “AS,” “diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis,” “epidemiology,” “surgery,” “etiology,” “management,” “surgery,” and “therapy.”

  • OUTCOME OF PRECONTOURED ANATOMICAL PLATE IN DISPLACED MIDDLE THIRD CLAVICULAR FRACTURES
    Speaker
    Dipendra Pandey
    National Trauma Centre
    Nepal
    Biography

    Dipendra Pandey is a Consultant Orthopaedics Surgeon working at government based National Trauma Centre at Kathmandu in Nepal. He completed his MS (Orthopaedics and Traumatology) from National Academy of Medical Sciences, Nepal. He was awarded with AOA Trauma Fellowship from NITOR, Bangladesh. Besides trauma, he is much interested in the field of Rheumatology and Osteoporosis.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Non-operative treatment for middle third clavicle fractures remained mainstay for until last two decades. But due to the prevalence of nonunion, symptomatic malunion and shortening for displaced fractures, trend has shifted towards operative management. Our study is aimed at prospectively evaluating the functional outcome of 120 patients treated with open reduction and plating with precontoured anatomical plate. This study estimates the functional outcome in terms of DASH score. Methodology: 120 patients from 16 years to 60 years of age, with displaced (>2cm) and/or shortened (>2cm) or comminuted middle third clavicular fractures were included in this prospective observational study conducted in Bir Hospital and National Trauma Center over four years period. Open reduction and internal fixation with precontoured anatomical plate was done. Postoperatively arm is held in a sling for about three weeks with intermittent pendulum exercise after one week or as soon as the pain is tolerable, and range of motion started after four weeks of surgery. Patients were followed up on 2, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Functional outcome was assessed using DASH score. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 22. Results: Mid clavicular fractures were more common among males and left side was commoner than right. Younger age group was more commonly affected. All fractures united in a mean radiological union period of 7.1 weeks. Six cases developed pain, 23 had hardware prominence, five case developed superficial infection. DASH score was at significant negligible level by 24 weeks. 98% of patients returned to their work by 12 weeks. Conclusion: Open reduction and internal fixation with pre-contoured anatomical plate in displaced middle third clavicular fractures is safe procedure that avoids complications associated with non-operative management and provides good functional outcome with early return to pre-injury activities.

  • ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS AND QUANTIFYING HLA B27 IN THE DIAGNOSIS
    Speaker
    Tahir M Afzal
    GMC Jammu
    India
    Abstract

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory sero-negative spondyloarthropathy. AS occurs 0.1 to 0.2% in general population. Genetic and environmental causes have been attributed AS causative influences. AS is believed to have an autosomal dominant inheritance. HLA B27 positivity is seen in 81-96% of patients. Axial skeleton is predominantly involved. Basic pathological change in AS is enthesopathy or enthesitis which results in ossification at places of insertion of tendons and ligaments eventually leading to ankylosis. Predominantly young males involved with male female ratio of 3:1 and usual age of onset is 20-30 years There are no specific lab tests for daignosis of AS. ESR, CRP, serum IgA and ALP are usually elevated. Rheumatoid factor/anti-CCP/ANA are not associated with the disease. It is important to diagnose the disease early in the course to prevent the development of irreversible deformity. Non-steroidal drugs are mainstay of the treatment. Physical therapy is of paramount importance in the total management to minimize degree of deformity and disability.

  • THE EFFECT OF ANTI-CANCER PREPARATION WITH A SELECTIVE EFFECT UKRAIN (NSC 631570) ON WOMEN REPRODUCTIVE CANCERS
    Speaker
    Wassil Nowicky
    Ukrainian Anti-Cancer Institute
    Austria
    Biography

    Dr. Wassil Nowicky — Dipl. Ing., Dr. techn., DDDr. h. c., Director of “Nowicky Pharma” and President of the Ukrainian Anti-Cancer Institute (Vienna, Austria). Has finished his study at the Radiotechnical Faculty of the Technical University of Lviv (Ukraine) with the end of 1955 with graduation to “Diplomingeniueur” in 1960 which title was nostrificated in Austria in 1975. Dr. Wassil Nowicky became the very first scientist in the development of the anticancer protonic therapy and is the inventor of the preparation against cancer with a selective effect on basis of celandine alkaloids “NSC-631570”. He used the factor that cancer cells are more negative charged than normal cells and invented the Celandine alkaloid with a positive charge thanks to which it accumulates in cancer cells very fast. Thus, Dr. Nowicky is invited as an Honorable Speaker to take part in many scientific international congresses and conferences in USA, Australia, Japan, UAE, Europe. Author of over 300 scientific articles dedicated to cancer research. Dr. Wassil Nowicky is a real member of the New York Academy of Sciences, member of the European Union for applied immunology and of the American Association for scientific progress, honorary doctor of the Janka Kupala University in Hrodno, doctor “honoris causa” of the Open international university on complex medicine in Colombo, honorary member of the Austrian Society of a name od Albert Schweizer. He has received the award for merits of National guild of pharmasists of America. the award of Austrian Society of sanitary, hygiene and public health services and others.

    Abstract

    First indications on the selective effect of NSC?631570 on the cancer cells were provided in an early study when different oxygen consumption by normal liver cells and Ehrlich’s tumor ascitic cells after the incubation with NSC?631570 was re-vealed. There was a report on the success-ful using NSC?631570 in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Also, in the tests of Na-tional Cancer Institute NSC?631570 was toxic against all ovarian cancer cell lines tested. NSC?631570 induced apoptosis in a panel of cancer cell lines (ovarial and cervical cancer HeLa, HeKB, HeKS32, HeBcl3, HeNFR and HeIKK, human colon cancer SW480, human renal carcinoma HEK293, human osteosarcoma MG?63) by activating the caspases of the intrinsic cell death pathway. Interestingly, non?transformed fibroblasts (hTERT) cell line was insensitive to the drug. In the tests on human ovarian and cervix carcinoma cells HeLa, squamous carcinoma cells WHCO5, normal kidney cell line Graham 293, and transformed kidney cell line Vero from African green monkey, NSC?631570 inhibited the tubulin polymerization and caused a metaphase block in cancer cells which is characterized by abnormal chromosomal distribution, and results in the formation of micronuclei and in apoptosis.

Day 2

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • HAPTOGLOBIN AND HEMOLYTIC DISEASE OF THE NEWBORN: A STUDY ON BANGALEE HINDU CASTE POPULATION, WEST BENGAL, INDIA

    University of Calcutta
    India
    Biography

    Professor Arup Ratan Bandyopadhyay is Professor and Former Head of the Department of Anthropology, University of Calcutta. He did M.Phil and PhD from University of Calcutta, India. He is the recipient of UGC Research Fellowship (for pursuing PhD, qualifying National Eligibility Test), Merit Award and Young Scientist Award. He was President of Anthropological and Behavioral Sciences section of the Indian Science Congress in its centenary year. He received seven national extra-mural research grants as Principal Investigator, including a grant from the British Council for collaboration with the Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, UK. He published more than 100 anthropological research articles in national and international journals on evolutionary biology, forensic anthropology, dental anthropology, public health in relation to medical genetics, cytogenetic and anthropometry of non-communicable disease, dermatoglyphics in medical and psychiatric disorders, and population genetics and human rights issues. He has delivered many invited Lectures / Keynote addresses and organizing committee members recently (January 5-7, 2018 – Bangkok, Thailand) in International Conference in Gynecology, Obstetrics and Reproductive medicine (GORM2018), World Congress on Gynecology, Obstetrics & Reproductive Health (July 16-17, 2018 – Bangkok, Thailand) and in 1st World Congress on Breast Cancer, Gynecology and Women Health (September 6-7, 2018 - Bangkok, Thailand)

    Abstract

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) used to be a major cause of fetal loss and death among newborn babies. It has been recognized that maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility is the most frequent cause of HDN. The present study attempts to find the role of haptoglobin in the hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), to ascertain the selective advantage of HP*1 alleles over HP*2 alleles, and to find the association of haptoglobin with ABO blood group system. To achieve the purpose a total of 572 children with HDN were studied along with their parents. On the other hand, 1000 newborns without HDN as controls were taken as controls. ABO blood group was done by antigenantisera agglutination test and haptoglobin (HP) types were ascertained by Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE) following standard techniques. Allele frequencies of these polymorphic markers calculated were computed by maximum likelihood estimation. Distribution of haptoglobin groups according to ABO blood group mother–child combinations were studied. Mothers of HDN patients revealed an excess frequency of `O` alleles and children with HDN demonstrated a significant excess of ‘A’ alleles compared to those of control 1000 newborns. The allele frequency of HP*1, was found to be higher among HDN children with ABO incompatible mother-child combinations, than those among the HDN patients with ABO compatible mother-child combinations. Further follow up of the HDN samples without detectable haptoglobin types required exchange transfusion, but those with detectable haptoglobin types did not require exchange transfusion irrespective of mother–child combination. Trend towards protective effects of HP in mean hemoglobin level and other parameters of HDN patients was evident.

  • AESTHETIC GYNECOLOGY FROM A GYNECOLOGIST

    ASFMS. Egypt
    Egypt
    Biography

    Ahmed Ras started his practice at the age of 22 years as a gynecologist, He is the general manager of al-fayrouz women health center, Egypt. He has trained over 2000 doctor on IVF, gynecological laparoscopy, hysteroscopy in several countries. (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Mauritania, Iraq, Kurdistan et al).head of aesthetic gynecology department in ASFMS

    Abstract

    Aesthetic gynecology is relatively a new field in the medical industry but is gaining momentum and has become common practice among women in the past few years. Gynecology deals with the health and functioning of the female reproductive system while Aesthetic Gynecology deals with the visual appearance, sensation and other cosmetic issues with regards to the female reproductive system. My talk will be on: change concepts about aesthetic gynecology-identify indication and alternatives-surgical and nonsurgical tools (in brief)-threads in gynecology-introduce my technique in vaginal tightening by single thread. How to start your cosmetics as a gynecologist.

Poster Presentation
Speaker
  • “A MOTHER’S SILENT ADVERSARY”: A CASE OF PREGNANT WOMAN WITH CERVICAL CANCER
    Speaker
    Paola M Millare
    Rizal Medical Center
    Philippines
    Biography

    Paola M Millare is a registered Nurse and Doctor. She has done her graduation at Far Eastern University– School of Medicine (2014). She is currently under training as a third year OB resident in Rizal Medical Center, Philippines.

    Abstract

    Cervical cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecological malignancy during pregnancy. Owing to the rarity of the disease, and the complexity of all factors that have to be taken into consideration, standardization of treatment is very difficult. In the Philippines, cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy among women. For this reason much attention has been put to early detection and treatment of the disease. The treatment of cancer during pregnancy is most challenging in the case of cervical cancer, since the pregnant uterus itself is affected. Approximately 500,000 new cases of invasive cervical cancer have been diagnosed worldwide each year with more than 250,000 women dying of the disease. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. For this reason, much attention has been put to early detection and treatment of the disease. The importance of Pap smear and visual inspection with acetic acid as screening tools cannot be overemphasized. However, cervical cancer remains a leading cause of cancer deaths among women with a low socioeconomic level. Almost half a million cases are diagnosed each year, 80% of whom are from developing countries like the Philippines. The overall survival rate is 44% or 10 in 100,000 women die of the disease in five years.

  • THERAPEUTIC RESPONSE AND SIDE EFFECTS OF CHEMOTERAPHY COMBINATION REGIMEN BETWEEN PACLITAXEL-CISPLATIN AND PACLITAXEL-CARBOPLATIN ON CERVICAL CANCER STAGE IIB
    Speaker
    Subhan Arif Rahman
    Hasanuddin University
    Indonesia
    Biography

    PHD Student

    Abstract

    Background: To compare therapeutic response and side effects of chemoteraphy combination regimen between paclitaxel-cisplatin and paclitaxel-carboplatin on cervical cancer stage IIB. Methods: 32 patients with stage II B cervical cancer that diagnosed by physical examination and CT scans were included in the study. Chemotherapy combination regimen paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 and cisplatin 50 mg/m2 in group one (16 patients) compared with paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 and Carboplatin 300 mg/m2 in group 2 (16 patients). The tumor volume was measured in three dimensions with computed tomography scan (CT scan) before and after six cycles. Clinical response is evaluated by physical examination. Result: The average tumor volume decreases significantly (73.41% vs. 75.65% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, P=0.001), complete response rate (25% vs. 31.2%), and partial response (62.5% vs. 56.2%), progressive response rate (12.5% vs. 6.2%), with p>0.05 which means no significant differences on complete response rate, partial response rate and progressive response rate between groups of carboplatin nor cisplatin group. Class three toxicity (CTC criteria) were more dominant in the cisplatin group, nausea and vomiting (12.5%), and hematologic grade three grade hematologic toxicity symptoms in both groups (12.5% vs. 12.5%) Conclussion: Chemotheraphy combination regimen of paclitaxel-carboplatin proved to be more effective in reduction of tumor size with fewer side effects compared to the paclitaxel-cisplatin combination regimen in stage IIB cervical cancer.

  • DETERMINANT FACTOR PSYCHOSOCIAL AND MEDICO OBSTETRIC IN REFERRAL PATIENT WITH COMPLICATION AT THE HOSPITAL OF EDUCATION NETWORK IN MAKASSAR CITY BETWEEN 01ST JANUARY- 31ST MARCH 2018
    Speaker
    Mohammad Khaerumayansyah
    Hasanuddin University
    Indonesia
    Biography

    PHD Student

    Abstract

    Background: Maternal mortality rate (MMR) is one indicator to see the health status of women AKI is also one of the targets set in the millennium development goals (MDGs), namely improving maternal health where the target to be achieved until 2015 is reducing to ¾ the risk of maternal mortality. Objective: Finding out whether the psychosocial determinants and obstetric medico effect on decision making refers to complications in the obstetric field. Method: The type of research used was observational research with cross sectional study design. The population of the study were all maternity patients and referred to the 430-school network education hospital with the sample of 70 respondents. Result: Results of the study showed that parity (p=0.013), pregnancy distance (p=0.000), poor obstetric history (p=0.013) with complications at Network Hospital in Makassar city. Conclusion: The results showed that the determinant factor of Medico obstetric more dominant influence on maternity referral with complication compared with psychosocial factor.

  • PERINEAL WARM COMPRESS DURING THE SECOND STAGE DECREASE INCIDENT AND DEGREE OF PERINEAL LACERATION IN PRIMIPAROUS
    Speaker
    Umiyanti Thenu
    Hasanuddin University
    Indonesia
    Biography

    Umiyanti Thenu has completed her medical degree from Indonesia Moeslim University, Indonesia. She is pursuing obstetrics and gynecology specialist medical education in Hasanuddin University, Indonesia.

    Abstract

    Background: Perineal warm compress during the second stage has been shown could decrease risk of perineal laceration or the need for episiotomy in primiparous, but the role between perineal body length with incidence and degree of perineal laceration is still in debate. Objective: To know the correlation of perineal warm compress and perineal body length during the second stage on incident and degree of perineal laceration in primiparous. Methods: The study was a nonrandomized controlled trial. There were 62 samples for the perineal warm compress group and 62 samples for the control group. Results: Using Chi Square correlation test, there’s a significant correlation between the perineal warm compress during the second stage with the incident of perineal laceration (p=0.030) and perineal laceration degree in the primiparaous (p=0.004). However, the perineal body length doesn’t have any correlation with the incident (p=1.000) and degree of the perineal laceration in the primiparous (p=0.149), but the perineal warm compress has a good utility in decreasing the degree of the perineal laceration, particularly in the primiparous with the perineal body length of < 3.3 cm (p=0.006). Conclusion: The perineal warm compress during the second stage decrease the incident and degree of perineal laceration in the primiparaous. But, the perineal body length doesn’t relate with incident and degree of perineal laceration in the primiparaous. Moreover, the perineal warm compress during the second stage can decrease the degree of perineal laceration in primiparous with perineal body length<3.3 cm.

  • EVALUATION OF SEVERE PREECLAMPSIA CLINICAL PATHWAYS IMPLEMENTATION BASED ON LENGTH OF STAY, USE OF DIAGNOSTIC TESTS AND USE OF DRUGS INDICATORS AT WAHIDIN SUDIROHUSODO HOSPITAL
    Speaker
    Nur Indah Purnamasari
    Hasanuddin University
    Indonesia
    Biography

    Nur Indah Purnamasari has completed her doctor’s education program in the Medical Faculty of Indonesian Muslim Universities. Currently, she is undergoing an obstetrics and gynecology specialist medical education program at Hasanuddin University

    Abstract

    health care, more predictable cost, more standardized cares, improving quality of care, improving the procedure costs, improving the quality of collected information and as a counter-check especially in high cost and high value cases. Method: A prospective cohort study was used to compare evaluation of clinical pathways implementation in patients with severe preeclampsia. Statistical analysis using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and Mann Whitney U test. Result: More patients with three days length of stay (10 patients or 50%) while patients without clinical pathways implementation with three days length of stay were (four patients or 20%). Type of test done in patients with clinical pathways implementation was complete blood count (20 patients or 100%) and the least was cardiotocography (eight patients or 40%). The most common drug used in patients with clinical pathways implementation was nifedipine/perdipine (19 patients or 95%) and the least was methyldopa (two patients or 10%) Conclusion: Clinical pathways implementation in patients with severe preeclampsia may reduce length of stay in hospital, provide guidelines for appropriate diagnostic test, but there is no difference in the effectiveness of drug use.

  • WHICH WHITESIDE’S LINE?
    Speaker
    Ervin Chino N Tayag
    University of Santo Tomas Hospital,
    Philippines
    Biography

    Ervin Chino N Tayag did his degree of BS Biology and Medicine from the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, Philippines. He is currently, the Chief Resident of the Department of Orthopedics of the University of Santo Tomas Hospital. His interests are in adult reconstruction and sports medicine.

    Abstract

    Background: The anteroposterior axis (Whiteside’s line) of the distal femur has been used to orient the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty. Although initially described as a line connecting the deepest point in the patellar groove and the center of the intercondylar notch, others have used a line connecting the deepest point in the patellar groove to the highest point of the intercondylar notch. Furthermore, depending on the system used, the axis could be determined on the distal femur before or after the distal femoral cut has been made. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the value of Whiteside’s line varied depending on which landmarks were used and on whether it is taken before or after the distal femoral cut. Methods: The following landmarks were identified from the distal femur of 40 knees: deepest point of the patellar groove, highest point of the intercondylar notch, center of the intercondylar notch, lateral epicondylar prominence, and medial epicondylar prominence. Three lines were drawn: one connecting the patellar groove to the highest point of the intercondylar notch (line A); one connecting the patellar groove to the center of the notch (line B); and one connecting the epicondyles (transepicondylar axis). The distal femur was cut using a total knee distal femoral cutting instrumentation. The same landmarks and lines were identified. The angles subtended by the various lines against a line perpendicular to the transepicondylar axis were recorded. Values in internal rotation were assigned negative numbers while values in external rotation were assigned positive numbers. Results: The mean results of lines A and B in both the uncut and cut distal femurs were negative. Line A measurements tended to be more negative than line B measurements. However, there were no statistical differences among the various measurements taken. Conclusion: Based on this report, measurements

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All the bank charges applicable during refund will be deducted from the account of participant.

 

Cancellation Policy

All cancellations or modifications of registration must be made in writing to finance@alliedacademies.com

If due to any reason, Allied academies postpone an event on the scheduled date, the participant is eligible for a credit of 100% of the registration fee paid. This credit shall only be used for another event organized by Allied academies within the period of one year from the date of rescheduling.

Postponement of event

If due to any reason, Allied academies postpone an event and the participant is unable or unwilling to attend the conference on rescheduled dates, he/she is eligible for a credit of 100% of the registration fee paid. This credit shall only be used for another event organized by Allied academies within the period of one year from the date of rescheduling.

Transfer of registration

All registrations, after payment of complete registration fee, are transferable to other persons from the same organization, if in case the person is unable to attend the event. Request for transfer of registration must be made by the registered person in writing to finance@alliedacademies.com. Details must include the full name of replaced new registrant, their title, contact phone number and email address. All other registration details will be assigned to the new person unless otherwise specified.

Registration can be transferred to one conference to another conference of Allied academies if the person is unable to attend one of the conferences.

However, Registration cannot be transferred if intimated within 14 days of the respective conference.

The transferred registrations will not be eligible for Refund.

This cancellation policy was last updated on April 04, 2015.

Visa Information

Keeping in view of increased security measures, we would like to request all the participants to apply for Visa as soon as possible.

Allied academies will not directly contact embassies and consulates on behalf of visa applicants. All delegates or invitees should apply for Business Visa only.

Important note for failed visa applications: Visa issues are not covered under the cancellation policy of Allied academies, including the inability to obtain a visa.

 Refund Policy:

If the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her participation to another person or event, then the following refund policies apply:

Keeping in view of advance payments towards Venue, Printing, Shipping, Hotels and other overhead charges, following Refund Policy Orders are available:

·        Before 60 days of the conference: Eligible for Full Refund after deduction of $100 towards service Fee.

·         Within 60-30 days of Conference: Eligible for 50% of payment Refund

·         Within 30 days of Conference: Not eligible for Refund

·         E-Poster Payments will not be refunded.

Accommodation Cancellation Policy:

Accommodation Service Providers (Hotels) have their own cancellation policies which are applicable when cancellations are made less than 30 days prior to arrival. If in case the registrant wishes to cancel or amend the accommodation, he/ she is expected to inform the organizing authorities on a prior basis. Allied academies will advise the registrant to ensure complete awareness of the cancellation policy of your accommodation provider, prior to cancellation or modification of their booking.

 

Authorization Policy

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